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The amazing things about Google Earth
Mis à jour : il y a 2 heures 16 min

Earth Hour and Sea Ice

il y a 3 heures 42 min

Earth Hour takes place tomorrow, March 25th, 2017 at 8:30-9:30PM local time. Earth Hour is when people (and organizations) around the globe switch off their lights to show support for the need to take action on climate change. Unfortunately, capturing imagery of the event from space would be almost impossible. The ‘Earth City Lights’ layer is relatively low resolution and created from a large number of images over time. Its a pity, because an animation of Earth Hour would be interesting given the complicated timezones of the earth.

Given that Earth Hour is about action on climate change, today we are having a look at some recent news from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado. Apparently 2017 saw a new record minimum for sea ice cover. This includes the smallest ‘maximum sea ice cover’ on record for the Northern Hemisphere and the smallest ‘minimum sea ice cover’ for the Southern Hemisphere.

We couldn’t find a KML for 2017 data, but the NSIDC does provide KMLs for 1979-2016 which you can find here.


White: Maximum Arctic Sea Ice extent March, 2016. Purple line: Median maximum extent 1979-2016.

The post Earth Hour and Sea Ice appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth imagery updates – Sport

jeu 23-03-2017

Although the majority of sights we look at in Google Earth imagery are natural disasters or man-made disasters, today we are having a look at a couple of sporting events. These are not coincidence, DigitalGlobe intentionally captured the imagery as part of its FirstLook program.

Australia Open
The Australia Open tennis tournament was held in Melbourne, Australia in January.


The image resolution is not good enough to see players on the courts, but we can see the crowds in the stands.


A number of different courts are in use in the image.

Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
The 2016 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix was held on November 27th, 2016. The most interesting aspect of this event is the mode of transport used by the spectators. The car parks are nearly empty, but the harbour is packed with yachts and two helicopters can be seen.


Some cars can be seen on the track, but we can’t tell whether this is during the actual race.

There is also an image of Río Cuarto, Argentina, which was captured on January 14th, 2017, in relation to the Dakar Rally, but we were unable to find anything in it in relation to the Rally.

To find the locations mentioned in this post download this KML file.

The post Google Earth imagery updates – Sport appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth Tour builder: Part 1 – Circling

mer 22-03-2017

Google Earth has the ability to display very sophisticated tours. However, this capability is underutilised. The reason for this is simple; there is a lack of good tools for creating tours, which means that it takes quite a lot of effort and technical know-how to create good tours. We plan to try and correct this by creating some tools to make tour creation easier.

For some examples of what is possible with tours we highly recommend having a look at the various tours created by Steven Ho.

Today, we are starting with the most basic type of tour: viewing a set of places in sequence. To use it, simply create a set of placemarks, save them as a KML file, upload the KML file below, then click the ‘Create tour’ button. The resulting tour should fly from placemark to placemark, circling each placemark once.

input,select{padding:4px;color:black;border:none}input[type="file"]{width:250px;}

Time between placemarks:

Time circling placemark:

Create Tour

We intend to add more features over time, including customising each stop, better flying between placemarks and more.

The post Google Earth Tour builder: Part 1 – Circling appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Planet adds time dimension to its maps

mar 21-03-2017

Satellite imaging company Planet has recently released a new version of Planet Explorer, a tool for exploring its vast collection of satellite imagery. Read more about it on the Planet blog. Planet has added a time toolbar very similar to Google Earth’s ‘historical imagery’ feature.

With a record launch of 88 satellites in February this year, and the acquisition of Terra Bella, Planet now operates 149 satellites — the largest fleet in human history.

To view the imagery simply go to Planet Explorer Beta. You can see monthly global base maps without even logging in. If you sign up for a free account, you can then see high resolution base maps and daily imagery within the US. For the rest of the globe the free account only provides access to low resolution monthly base maps. In addition, the free account gives you access to the Open California dataset, which allows you to download imagery for California two weeks after capture. The Open California data is shared with a fairly liberal licence.

Keep in mind that most of the imagery is relatively low resolution at 2-5m per pixel. Terra Bella imagery is sub-metre per pixel, but still not as good as other commercial suppliers such as DigitalGlobe and nothing like as good as aerial imagery. Nevertheless, the imagery is sufficient for seeing large scale phenomenon such as flooding (as seen in the YouTube video above), wildfire, tornadoes (see below), landslides etc.


The scar from an EF4 tornado that struck Perryville, Missouri on February 28th,
2016. See in Planet Explorer.

The post Planet adds time dimension to its maps appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Street View comes to Tunisia and a Vanuatuan volcano

lun 20-03-2017

Google has recently added Street View for Tunisia and the island of Ambrym, Vanuatu.

Tunisia

Tunisia has some interesting architecture, including mosques, churches and even ancient Roman ruins.


Mosquée Malek Ibn Anas de Carthage. See it in Google Maps


Cathedral of St Vincent de Paul Évêque de Tunis.See it in Google Maps


The Amphitheatre of El Jem. See it in Google Maps

The blue outlines for Tunisia are not yet visible in Google Earth, but the Street View is accessible. Still, it is much easier to explore with Google Maps.

Volcano on Ambrym, Vanuatu

Ambrym is a volcanic island in the archipelago of Vanuatu that features one of the largest boiling lava lakes in the world. Google recently visited it with the Street View Trekker. Read more about it here.


One of the lava lakes. See it in Google Maps


Camped right next to an active volcano! See it in Google Maps

The blue outlines for Vanuatu are not yet visible in Google Earth, and it doesn’t appear to be possible to access the Vanuatu Street View via Google Earth at present. So use Google Maps instead.

The post Street View comes to Tunisia and a Vanuatuan volcano appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Kyrgyzstan landslides in Google Earth

ven 17-03-2017

On April 27th, 2016, a landslide occurred in Kyrgyzstan and was captured on video as you can see below. The Landslide Blog also wrote about it here and here. We have been keeping an eye on the location and Google has recently updated the imagery.

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Before and after of the landslide in the video.

Having looked around the area it is clear that the region is very susceptible to landslides, with evidence of past landslides almost anywhere you look. Unfortunately, there is not a lot of imagery and most of the landslides took place before the earliest image. We did find one more that took place in 2016, although it is not quite covered by the latest image.

Before and after of another landslide that occurred in 2016.

Apart from the immediate danger from landslides, there is also the phenomenon of landslide dams, examples of which we have looked at before. A landslide dam occurs when the landslide blocks a river, creating a lake behind it and a catastrophic flood may occur when the dam gives way. We had a look around the region and found several cases where there probably was a small landslide dam and there is significant risk of such disasters in the future.


This landslide blocked the river, which has since carved a channel through the debris.

In the picture above, the slope has been slipping for many years and may never have caused a landslide dam, but the risk is clearly significant as a dam would result in the flooding of the nearby houses and its collapse could cause flooding downstream. Just a little further upstream it looks as if part of the town is slowly sliding into the river:


Also note the smaller landslide on the opposite bank which could potentially have created a landslide dam.

To find the above locations in Google Earth, download this KML file. We have marked some of the more notable landslides that we found, but there are many more in the region.

According to this video, a significant cause of the landslides is deforestation, followed by uncontrolled grazing. Trees and other plant cover helps to stabilize slopes.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {jQuery(function(){jQuery('.sliders').each(function(i){jQuery(this).beforeAfter({imagePath: '/js/utils/',showFullLinks : false});});});});

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Catégories: Sites Anglophones

The Suez Canal expansion project

jeu 16-03-2017

Yesterday we had a look at the Panama Canal and its recent expansion. Today we are looking at the Suez Canal, which was also expanded between August 2014 and August 2015.

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Before and after of the Suez Canal using Landsat/Sentinel global mosaics 2014 and 2016.

Before and after of a section of the Suez Canal showing the new channel and how the ships can now travel in both directions. In the later image they are going north in the right channel and south in the left channel

The canal needs constant maintenance, and we can see below how even before the expansion project there were significant changes due to the dredging work. In both images we can see dredgers at work. They appear to have initially been filling in the right bank and are now creating new islands in the lake using the dredged sand.

Before and after of the Great Bitter Lake on the Suez Canal 2007 and 2014.

Also interesting is the long history of canals in the region as you can read about on Wikipedia. There have historically been several canals from the Nile to the Red Sea, although we didn’t find any maps showing their exact routes – which may not even be known. There is, today, a smaller canal that runs from the Nile to the Suez Canal just north of the Great Bitter Lake.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {jQuery(function(){jQuery('.sliders').each(function(i){jQuery(this).beforeAfter({imagePath: '/js/utils/',showFullLinks : false});});});});

The post The Suez Canal expansion project appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

The Panama Canal expansion project

mer 15-03-2017

We recently had a look at water transfer canals in Brazil. Today we are looking at the Panama Canal and in a future post we will have a look at the Suez Canal, both of which have recently been expanded.

The Panama Canal rises 26 metres above sea level and has locks at each end to raise the ships. The original locks were 33.5 metres wide, which limits the size of ship that can pass through the canal. This is such an important restriction that ships are often built specifically to meet that restriction – a size known as Panamax. The expansion project was aimed at allowing for larger ships to pass through the canal, as well as faster transit times and more efficient use of water.


The new locks have large reutilization basins which allow 60% of the water used in each transit to be reused.


Pacific Ocean Locks. 1: Miraflores Locks (original). 2. Pedro Miguel Locks (original) 3. Cocoli Locks (new).

.sliderInput{border:0; color:#006FBA; font-weight:bold;background-color: white;padding:0px;box-shadow:none}

Speed in milliseconds per image:
Construction of the Pacific Locks.
 


Atlantic Ocean Locks. 1: Gatun Locks (original). 2. Agua Clara Locks (new).

Speed in milliseconds per image:
Construction of the Atlantic Locks.
 

animateImages([{id:"PacificLocks",qty:9,interval:1000},{id:"AtlanticLocks",qty:9,interval:1000}]);

The post The Panama Canal expansion project appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth Imagery Update – Plane Crash, Derailed Train, Fireworks Explosion and World Series

mar 14-03-2017

Google has recently done an imagery update. Here are a few sights we have found so far.

Plane crash in Kyrgyzstan
On January 16, 2017, a Turkish cargo plane, Turkish Airlines Flight 6491, crashed into a residential area just short of the runway of Manas International Airport, Kyrgyzstan. All four crew members and 35 people on the ground were killed in the crash. Read more about it here and on Wikipedia.


The aircraft was travelling from left to right in the above image.


Zooming out a bit we can see how close it was to getting to the runway.

Derailed train in Cameroon
On October 21st, 2016, a passenger train derailed in Eséka, Cameroon, killing at least 79 people and injuring 550. The DigitalGlobe image was captured ten days later so some cleanup has already been done, but we can see where the accident happened and some of the carriages by the side of the track. There are more carriages next to the station which may have already been transported there from the accident site. Read more about it here and on Wikipedia.


 
Fireworks explosion in Mexico
On December 20th, 2016, a fireworks explosion occurred at the San Pablito Market in the city of Tultepec, Mexico, killing at least 36 and injuring 84. The imagery is from January 4th, and the area has been cleaned up. See a video here and read about it on Wikipedia

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Before and after of the San Pablito Market.

World Series parade, Chicago
The Chicago Cubs, a Major League Baseball club, won the 2016 World Series after a 108-year drought. To celebrate they held a parade on November 4th, 2016, which was attended by an estimated 5 million people. DigitalGlobe captured an image showing the crowds in Grant Park, the final destination of the parade.

To find the above locations in Google Earth download this KML file.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {jQuery(function(){jQuery('.sliders').each(function(i){jQuery(this).beforeAfter({imagePath: '/js/utils/',showFullLinks : false});});});});

The post Google Earth Imagery Update – Plane Crash, Derailed Train, Fireworks Explosion and World Series appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Water transfer canals in Brazil

lun 13-03-2017

We recently came across this story about a water transfer project in Brazil. Since we have previously had a look at China’s North-South water transfer project, we thought it might be interesting to have a look at Brazil’s project in Google Earth. It was difficult to find the location, but we eventually found this Wikipedia page that has a map. We have since located and traced out the canals that have been built so far. In many places there is no recent imagery and their route can only be seen in the latest Landsat/Sentinel global mosaic in ‘historical imagery’.

The Brazil water transfer project consists of two separate canals carrying water from the São Francisco River to the four north-eastern states of Brazil. There are several dams along the route of the canal which have been specially constructed as part of the project. The two main canals are each around 200 km long. There are also tunnels under roads, bridges over valleys and in one place an 18 km tunnel through a hill. The project has reportedly cost around US$ 2.5 billion so far. The region the water is serving is known as Sertão and is a naturally arid region.


The canal routes. Red: canals. Blue: river bed. Yellow: possible future extension.

Keep in mind that once the water is transported via the canals, it flows into the local rivers and can be utilised by towns downstream of the end of the canal all the way to the coast.


A tunnel under a village.


One of the many dams.

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Play ‘spot the difference’. 2001 vs 2016. If you know where to look you can spot both canals. See map above for clues.

To find the canals in Google Earth download this KML file.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {jQuery(function(){jQuery('.sliders').each(function(i){jQuery(this).beforeAfter({imagePath: '/js/utils/',showFullLinks : false});});});});

The post Water transfer canals in Brazil appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Petabytes of imagery

ven 10-03-2017

Last year we made a rough estimate of the size of the Google Earth database. Our best guess was about 3 petabytes.

Satellite imaging company Planet has just released some information about the size of their imagery database. It currently stands at 7+ Petabytes with 7+ Terabytes being added daily. And this is before the data starts flowing from the 88 new satellites it recently launched. Read more on the Planet Blog.

There are two other major satellite imagery suppliers, DigitalGlobe and CNES/Astrium. We expect that their archives are still larger than Planet’s as they have been operating for much longer. However, Planet now owns the largest fleet of satellites in the world and will presumably eventually have the largest imagery database. A number of countries have their own imaging satellites both for military intelligence and government planning. There are also various weather satellites that typically capture very low resolution imagery, but on a regular basis (every few minutes in some cases).

According to Google the Landsat archive consists of around 1.3 petabytes of data and the Copernicus imagery is around half a petabyte.

Google also gathers aerial imagery, some of which is processed into 3D imagery. This is higher resolution than satellite imagery, but gathered much less frequently. Many countries also have aerial imagery programmes such as the National Agriculture Imagery Program in the US, and there are also private companies that gather aerial imagery for commercial use. It is probable that many countries have archives of aerial photography that have never been digitized.

Due to the lack of information about all the different imagery out there it is impossible to accurately estimate its total size, but our guess is it exceeds 100 Petabytes.

Do any of our readers know the sizes of any particular imagery collections?


Animation of the seasons created by NASA using Lansat imagery.

The post Petabytes of imagery appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Descartes Labs imagery search engine

jeu 09-03-2017

We have looked at a number of image recognition based search engines before, such as Google faces tracker, which we saw in 2013, which was designed for finding faces in Google Earth imagery, or Terrapattern a more recent and more general search engine. We have also had a look at DigitalGlobe’s use of artificial intelligence to analyse imagery.

Today we are looking at Decartes Labs which is very similar to Terrapattern. You select a location and it finds other imagery with similar features. They have three imagery datasets:
* Aerial imagery of the US from the National Agriculture Imagery Program of the USDA.
* A global mosaic of Landsat imagery.
* PlanetScope imagery of China (a product of satellite imaging company Planet).

Click on a wind turbine and it will find a thousand others instantly. There are a few similar objects it picks up that are not wind turbines, but it is quite impressive that the majority of them are, despite being captured from different angles, facing different directions and having their shadows in different directions.

Be sure to try other distinctive features such as baseball fields, parking lots, storage yards, airports and more.

The post Descartes Labs imagery search engine appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Sentinel 2B successfully launched

mer 08-03-2017

On March 7th, 2017, Arianespace, on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA) successfully launched the new earth imaging satellite Sentinel-2B. It has identical specifications to Sentinel-2A which has been operating since June 2015. The satellites have identical orbits but are positioned 180° apart, which allows them to cover the earth every 5 days instead of the 10 day intervals that Sentinel-2A was achieving on its own. Read more about it here.

The Sentinel imagery is freely available to the public and can be obtained from several sources, including Amazon’s AWS and the Google Cloud. Using the Amazon AWS source, which provides thumbnail previews, we have created special KMLs that allow you to preview the latest Sentinel imagery and create animations using the thumbnails.

Sentinel imagery is relatively low resolution at 10 m per pixel. It is still useful for very large scale phenomena. It is also used in Google Earth for the historical imagery global mosaics. The mosaics are mostly created from Landsat imagery because the Sentinel imagery only covers mid 2015 onwards. Sentinel imagery is slightly higher resolution, and now higher frequency, than Landsat imagery.

A much longer launch video can be found here.

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Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Sinking California and UAVSAR Data

mar 07-03-2017

We recently came across this interesting article about how the Joaquin Valley in California is sinking due to the extraction of ground water. It has an interesting map of the subsidence that was done in Google Earth. However, they do not seem to provide the KML file. We did find the source of the data is NASA’s UAVSAR program which you can read more about here. It basically consists of aerial radar surveys. Radar maps not only highlight different surface types but multiple surveys over time can show changes in elevation or land use such as the subsidence mentioned above.

It is possible to view some of the data and even download it to Google Earth. Use this map to find data strips. The data isn’t only of the US, but includes quite a lot from South America, Japan, Greenland, Iceland and a few other locations. You need to sign up to download the data as KML, but signup is free.

The imagery is quite low resolution but it highlights built up areas and farmlands clearly.


A strip of radar data in California.


Mount Aso, Japan.

The post Sinking California and UAVSAR Data appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth Imagery – Tailings Dam Collapse

lun 06-03-2017

On 8th August, 2016, a containing dam failed at the Xiangjiang Wanji Aluminium plant in Luoyang, Henan Province in China. About 2 million cubic meters of red mud was released, spreading out over 2 kilometres and burying parts of a village in the process. Luckily, according to this article, no one was killed or injured.

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Before and after of the mudslide.

Before and after closeup of some of the houses that were buried .

Find the location in Google Earth with this KML file.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {jQuery(function(){jQuery('.sliders').each(function(i){jQuery(this).beforeAfter({imagePath: '/js/utils/',showFullLinks : false});});});});

We learned about the above disaster via the Landslide Blog.

Similar stories we have covered in the past include another tailings dam failure in Brazil – the Bento Rodrigues disaster, the collapse of a dam containing construction waste in Shenzhen, China, and a major landslide in the Bingham Canyon mine in the US.

The post Google Earth Imagery – Tailings Dam Collapse appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth faster loading tip: use network links

ven 03-03-2017

A common problem with Google Earth is long loading times due to having a lot of stuff in your ‘My Places’. Google Earth stores your ‘My Places’ in a KML file appropriately called myplaces.kml. Exactly where that file is stored depends on your operating system. See this page if you need to know where to find it. The myplaces.kml file is loaded when you open Google Earth and only saved when you exit, or if you explicitly save it during the session.

If you notice Google Earth is taking longer to load than it used to, then the most likely cause is a large myplaces.kml file. Before proceeding with the following tip, it is highly recommended that you backup your ‘My Places’. Simply right-click on the topmost folder and select ‘Save Place As’ then select where you want to back it up to.

The first step is to go through your saved places and remove anything you no-longer need. However, if you still have a number of items that you wish to keep and loading is still slow, then one trick is to move items out of your myplaces.kml file and into separate files that are referenced via a special feature called a network link. You probably don’t need to worry about placemarks that you have personally created as they typically take up very little space in KML. The real culprits are KML files you have imported from elsewhere that have a large number of items. For example, we found that just one item, a map of world borders constituted nearly a quarter of our myplaces.kml files size. The downside of moving items to network linked files is that you can no-longer edit them directly, so look for items that you don’t intend to edit in future.

Once you have identified an item you wish to extract, right-click on it and select ‘Save Place As’. Select a place to save it to on your computer that will remain accessible and that you won’t delete by mistake. Now right-click on ‘My Places’ and select Add->Network Link. Give your network link a useful name and click ‘browse’ and select the file you saved earlier. You should now see the items you saved in the new network link folder and you can safely delete the old version of it from My Places. Repeat this for other items, or alternatively put all the items you wish to extract into a single folder and do the above procedure only once.

Using the above tactic we were able to bring our ‘myplaces.kml’ file down from 40Mb to just 5Mb and Google Earth is loading a lot faster.

Keep the network links deselected and Google Earth will not bother reading when loading.

The post Google Earth faster loading tip: use network links appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

A bridge collapse in India

jeu 02-03-2017

In early August, 2016, a bridge over the river River Savitri in India collapsed, plunging several cars and two buses into the river which was swollen with floods at the time.

We have been keeping an eye on the location because DigitalGlobe had listed it as a target for their ‘FirstLook’ program. It would appear that if DigitalGlobe did capture imagery of it, it hasn’t yet made its way into Google Earth. However, there is now an image from CNES/Astrium dated November 25th, 2016 which shows the collapsed bridge:

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Before and after showing the collapsed bridge. The top bridge in the image is apparently newer and was not affected.

We also noticed a vehicle in the river in an earlier image. It doesn’t look like it is fording the river, but rather has backed into the water for some reason:

Find the location of the above bridge in Google Earth with this KML file.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {jQuery(function(){jQuery('.sliders').each(function(i){jQuery(this).beforeAfter({imagePath: '/js/utils/',showFullLinks : false});});});});

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Catégories: Sites Anglophones

The Gatlinburg, Tennessee wildfire in Google Earth

mer 01-03-2017

Google has recently added some imagery relating to wildfires in the south eastern United States.

Gatlinburg, Tennessee
The Great Smoky Mountain wildfires of late November, 2016 was a group of wildfires that affected a number of towns near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in eastern Tennessee. According to Wikipedia, the fires have claimed at least 14 lives, injured 134, and are one the largest natural disasters in the history of Tennessee. There is a DigitalGlobe false colour image mostly covering the town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, but we can also see the outskirts of Pigeon Forge, which was affected by the fire as well.


Some burnt houses in Gatlinburg, Tennessee


The outskirts of Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, showing houses destroyed by the fires.

North Carolina wildfires
Nearby, in North Carolina, there were also a number of wildfires in November. There is a DigitalGlobe image showing two fires burning near Lake Lure, North Carolina.

According to this article about 1000 people were ordered to evacuate Chimney Rock – a small town near the centre of the above image.

Find the above locations in Google Earth with this KML file. We have also marked the extent of the imagery and the extent of the Gatlinburg fire (as seen in the imagery).

The post The Gatlinburg, Tennessee wildfire in Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

The best of Google Earth for February 2017

mar 28-02-2017

February saw two new countries, Ghana and Senegal, added to Street View.

A lot of new imagery was added to ‘historical imagery’ and we had a look at some of the landslides caused by the Kaikora Earthquake and wildfires in Chile. We also took another look at the extent of the Chile wildfires using Landsat and Sentinel imagery. Earlier in the month we had a look at imagery relating to cyclone NADA-16, that struck the east coast of India, imagery relating to an earthquake in Indonesia and imagery relating to the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

We had a look at animations of a few open pit mines around the world.

We had a look at how DigitalGlobe is helping to combat slavery with the use of high resolution satellite imagery of fishing ships, which helps investigators analyse their behaviour and identify individual ships.

Satellite imaging company Planet set several new records, including largest number of satellites launched simultaneously and largest satellite fleet. In addition, the sale of Google’s Terra Bella to Planet was announced.

Google released some DigitalGlobe imagery of the Oroville Dam crisis.

Google Earth VR won a Lumiere award – the Century Award for VR in service of environmental enrichment.

We had a look at a message in protest of a planned high speed rail link in the UK.

We had a look at some ancient earthworks in the Amazon.

Google updated the search results box in Google Earth which fixed some long outstanding bugs.

Coming up in March:
Google announced that it will be open sourcing Google Earth Enterprise in March.
ESA will be launching imaging satellite Sentinel-2B – currently scheduled for March 6/7.

The post The best of Google Earth for February 2017 appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Animating Open Pit Mines with Google Earth

lun 27-02-2017

Recently, one of our GEB readers pointed us to a Google Earth Engine Timelapse of an open pit mine near Bełchatów, Poland. We thought it would be interesting to do animations of it and other open pit mines using Google Earth imagery.

We chose a selection from this list on Wikipedia.

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Speed in milliseconds per image:
Bełchatów, Poland. Coal mine.
 

Speed in milliseconds per image:
Cerro Vanguardia, Argentina. Gold and silver mine.
 

Speed in milliseconds per image:
Cadia, Australia. Gold and copper mine.
 

Speed in milliseconds per image:
Letlhakane, Botswana. Diamond mine.
 

animateImages([{id:"CerroVanguardia",qty:20,interval:500},{id:"Belchatow",qty:33,interval:500},{id:"Cadia",qty:21,interval:500},{id:"Letlhakane",qty:33,interval:500}]);

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Catégories: Sites Anglophones