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February 10/11, 2017 Penumbral Lunar Eclipse and Comet

jeu 09-02-2017

There will be a penumbral lunar eclipse this weekend on February 10 or 11 depending on which part of the world you live in.

For studying eclipses, we used to recommend a site called ‘HeyWhatsThat’ but it used the Google Earth API/plugin, which was discontinued last month. Another site by Xavier M. Jubier that offers KMZ files relating to eclipses appears to be no longer being maintained and it does not include a KMZ for this weekend’s lunar eclipse.
[ Update 2017-02-10: We were incorrect and Xavier’s website is being maintained. See his message in the comments below including a link to a map and a way to get a KMZ version. ]


The eclipse will be visible from much parts of the world. Image from Wikimedia.

If any of our readers knows of a site that offers eclipse details that can be viewed with Google Earth, please let us know in the comments.

The site timeanddate.com has 2D maps of the eclipse and if you enter your location it can give you exact local times for when to see it.

The community telescope organization Slooh will be broadcasting the eclipse live on their site. As far as we can tell it will be publicly available without having to become a member.

Coinciding with the eclipse is the closest approach of green comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková. Read more about it here.

There will also be a partial solar eclipse on February 26, visible in parts of South America and Southern Africa

The post February 10/11, 2017 Penumbral Lunar Eclipse and Comet appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Ancient earthworks in the Amazon

mer 08-02-2017

We recently came across this interesting story about ancient earthworks in the state of Acre, Brazil. Most versions of the story call the earthworks geoglyphs but technically, geoglyph should only refer to a feature that was specifically created either as art or to have some meaning, whereas it is unknown what purpose these earthworks served. Having said that, the Wikipedia page on Geoglyph features a photo of one of the Brazilian earthworks.

We found it frustrating that most versions of the story do not give coordinates for any of the earthworks, but eventually we found this article which features a KML file with locations of 440 of them.

The earthworks have only been found where the forest has been cleared. It is possible that the ancient Amazonians preferred the same locations that the current farmers who are clearing the land do, but it is quite likely that there are still many more earthworks to be found in uncleared areas. In addition, it is notable that the extent of earthworks shown in the KML file closely matches the extent of high resolution imagery, suggesting there are many more to be found as more imagery becomes available. This fact highlights the usefulness of Google Earth as a valuable tool for archaeologists. Some nearby regions have fresh imagery from 2016 so it is probable that more discoveries are already being made.

Looking around ourselves we started to see all sorts of shapes, such as the irregular circular ditch below:

But not being trained archaeologists we have no idea whether or not this is a recent excavation or an as yet unmarked ancient site or possibly just a natural feature that looks like a man made ditch.

The post Ancient earthworks in the Amazon appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Ancient earthworks in the Amazon

mer 08-02-2017

We recently came across this interesting story about ancient earthworks in the state of Acre, Brazil. Most versions of the story call the earthworks geoglyphs but technically, geoglyph should only refer to a feature that was specifically created either as art or to have some meaning, whereas it is unknown what purpose these earthworks served. Having said that, the Wikipedia page on Geoglyph features a photo of one of the Brazilian earthworks.

We found it frustrating that most versions of the story do not give coordinates for any of the earthworks, but eventually we found this article which features a KML file with locations of 440 of them.

The earthworks have only been found where the forest has been cleared. It is possible that the ancient Amazonians preferred the same locations that the current farmers who are clearing the land do, but it is quite likely that there are still many more earthworks to be found in uncleared areas. In addition, it is notable that the extent of earthworks shown in the KML file closely matches the extent of high resolution imagery, suggesting there are many more to be found as more imagery becomes available. This fact highlights the usefulness of Google Earth as a valuable tool for archaeologists. Some nearby regions have fresh imagery from 2016 so it is probable that more discoveries are already being made.

Looking around ourselves we started to see all sorts of shapes, such as the irregular circular ditch below:

But not being trained archaeologists we have no idea whether or not this is a recent excavation or an as yet unmarked ancient site or possibly just a natural feature that looks like a man made ditch.

The post Ancient earthworks in the Amazon appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth right-click menu in “Search” fixed

mar 07-02-2017

Back in 2014, Google updated the search results functionality in Google Earth. At the time we noted that there were two bugs introduced: the ‘get directions’ functionality didn’t work properly and the right-click menu in the search results box didn’t work. The ‘get directions’ problem was fixed fairly quickly. We recently heard that a few problems had been fixed to do with the search functionality. It would appear that the right-click menu is now working properly. We are not sure if it has been broken since 2014 as we have been using the buttons below the search box, which provide the same functionality.

The search results window works using embedded html so changes to it are done on the server and not as part of the client, so there is no need to update Google Earth for the fix to take effect.

When there was a problem with ‘get directions’ we noted that it did not occur in Google Earth version 6.2, so we decided to download that version to see what differences there were with search. We found that the search in version 6.2 currently doesn’t seem to work at all. A search either fails to show any results, or it shows a result that cannot be selected. Do any of our readers still use version 6.2? Is there a specific reason for not upgrading? Let us know in the comments.

We still don’t like the fact that the search functionality tends to be very minimal about results returned. For many searches it tends to return a single result only. Several years ago it used to return a lot more results, which was quite useful for some particular tasks. It also doesn’t seem to be fully context-sensitive for many searches. For example, if you are viewing Livingston, California and search for ‘Livingston’, it flies you to Livingston, Scotland.

The post Google Earth right-click menu in “Search” fixed appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth right-click menu in “Search” fixed

mar 07-02-2017

Back in 2014, Google updated the search results functionality in Google Earth. At the time we noted that there were two bugs introduced: the ‘get directions’ functionality didn’t work properly and the right-click menu in the search results box didn’t work. The ‘get directions’ problem was fixed fairly quickly. We recently heard that a few problems had been fixed to do with the search functionality. It would appear that the right-click menu is now working properly. We are not sure if it has been broken since 2014 as we have been using the buttons below the search box, which provide the same functionality.

The search results window works using embedded html so changes to it are done on the server and not as part of the client, so there is no need to update Google Earth for the fix to take effect.

When there was a problem with ‘get directions’ we noted that it did not occur in Google Earth version 6.2, so we decided to download that version to see what differences there were with search. We found that the search in version 6.2 currently doesn’t seem to work at all. A search either fails to show any results, or it shows a result that cannot be selected. Do any of our readers still use version 6.2? Is there a specific reason for not upgrading? Let us know in the comments.

We still don’t like the fact that the search functionality tends to be very minimal about results returned. For many searches it tends to return a single result only. Several years ago it used to return a lot more results, which was quite useful for some particular tasks. It also doesn’t seem to be fully context-sensitive for many searches. For example, if you are viewing Livingston, California and search for ‘Livingston’, it flies you to Livingston, Scotland.

The post Google Earth right-click menu in “Search” fixed appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Sale of Terra Bella to Planet now official

lun 06-02-2017

Last month we reported on a rumour that Google’s parent company, Alphabet, was selling their satellite imaging company Terra Bella to another satellite imaging company Planet. It is now official as announced on both the Planet Blog and Terra Bella’s home page (which directs you to the Planet Blog article). Terra Bella was formerly SkyBox Imaging and was acquired by Google in 2014.

The announcement says that the deal includes a multi-year contract between Planet and Google whereby Google will purchase Earth-imaging data from Planet. What we don’t know is what Google plans to do with the imagery. Do any of our readers know? We have not seen much in the way of Terra Bella imagery in Google Earth. We have seen some imagery from them in cases of disaster response. We assume Terra Bella has a number of corporate customers, but presumably those will stay with Terra Bella – becoming Planet customers.

Google Earth would actually benefit from Terra Bella imagery in areas where it doesn’t yet have high resolution imagery – which is actually quite a lot of places, typically hard to photograph areas such as the far north or tropical rain forests with near permanent cloud cover. Another opportunity would be more global mosaics, but this time using higher resolution Planet imagery rather than the relatively low resolution Landsat / Sentinel-2 imagery.

Over the last few years, Planet has become the world leader in medium resolution, high frequency satellite imagery. They have 60 medium resolution satellites (3-5m per pixel). That is set to more than double this Valentine’s Day when they plan to launch another 88 all at once. They also own the Rapid Eye satellites (five satellites with approx. 5m per pixel resolution) which they acquired in 2015. Terra Bella has 7 sub-metre resolution satellites and plans to launch many more. In contrast, the other major players in the Satellite imaging business have fewer satellites but higher resolution (down to 25cm per pixel in some cases).

The post Sale of Terra Bella to Planet now official appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Sale of Terra Bella to Planet now official

lun 06-02-2017

Last month we reported on a rumour that Google’s parent company, Alphabet, was selling their satellite imaging company Terra Bella to another satellite imaging company Planet. It is now official as announced on both the Planet Blog and Terra Bella’s home page (which directs you to the Planet Blog article). Terra Bella was formerly SkyBox Imaging and was acquired by Google in 2014.

The announcement says that the deal includes a multi-year contract between Planet and Google whereby Google will purchase Earth-imaging data from Planet. What we don’t know is what Google plans to do with the imagery. Do any of our readers know? We have not seen much in the way of Terra Bella imagery in Google Earth. We have seen some imagery from them in cases of disaster response. We assume Terra Bella has a number of corporate customers, but presumably those will stay with Terra Bella – becoming Planet customers.

Google Earth would actually benefit from Terra Bella imagery in areas where it doesn’t yet have high resolution imagery – which is actually quite a lot of places, typically hard to photograph areas such as the far north or tropical rain forests with near permanent cloud cover. Another opportunity would be more global mosaics, but this time using higher resolution Planet imagery rather than the relatively low resolution Landsat / Sentinel-2 imagery.

Over the last few years, Planet has become the world leader in medium resolution, high frequency satellite imagery. They have 60 medium resolution satellites (3-5m per pixel). That is set to more than double this Valentine’s Day when they plan to launch another 88 all at once. They also own the Rapid Eye satellites (five satellites with approx. 5m per pixel resolution) which they acquired in 2015. Terra Bella has 7 sub-metre resolution satellites and plans to launch many more. In contrast, the other major players in the Satellite imaging business have fewer satellites but higher resolution (down to 25cm per pixel in some cases).

The post Sale of Terra Bella to Planet now official appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth imagery update

ven 03-02-2017

Google has recently updated the ‘historical layer’, this time including the southern hemisphere, which we previously noted had been missed in the last update. Unfortunately, due to the recent demise of the Google Earth plugin/API we are unable to create a map of the updates. However, we can still track down some interesting sights where the imagery was captured as part of DigitalGlobe’s FirstLook program.

Google has also pushed out a large number of new 3D areas.

Crater?
There is some imagery on the east coast of India dated December 3rd, 2016, which was captured in response to cyclone NADA-16 which made landfall in late November. Although it does look wetter than usual, it is a naturally we region with a lot of lakes and flooded fields and we didn’t find any flooded houses. We did, however, come across the circular feature below:

Do any of our readers know whether this is an impact crater or some other geological phenomenon?

Indonesian Earthquake
A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck Aceh province, Indonesia, on December 7th, 2016. There is quite a lot of DigitalGlobe imagery of the region from December and January. According to Wikipedia 104 people were killed and over 1000 injured. Although it was reported that 686 structures were either destroyed or damaged, we were not able to positively identify any in the imagery as it is not very high resolution.

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race
There is some black and white imagery of Sydney harbour relating to the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race which took place on December 26th, 2016. As far as we can tell, the actual race was not captured in the imagery.

To see the above locations in Google Earth download this KML file.

If you come across any interesting sights in the imagery do let us know in the comments.

The post Google Earth imagery update appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

File associations and a Google Earth / Google Earth Pro dual installation

jeu 02-02-2017

Today’s post is a tip for people that have both Google Earth and Google Earth Pro installed on Windows.

Today, our Google Earth installation updated automatically to the latest version. The problem is that we have both Google Earth and Google Earth Pro installed. We had previously manually updated Google Earth Pro when the latest version was released a couple of weeks ago. The result is that this latest update has reset all the file associations back to Google Earth even though we prefer to use Google Earth Pro. This wouldn’t be so much of a problem if you could just use the standard Windows method for changing file associations via the ‘Open With’ dialog box. However, due to a quirk in the way Google has set up the file associations in the Windows Registry, this method doesn’t work for Google Earth.

One solution we have used in the past is actually quite simple, but easily overlooked. The file associations are tied to whichever application was installed last. So if you want you KML and KMZ files to open in Google Earth Pro by default, you could simply reinstall it, and it would capture the file associations. However, when we tried this technique by installing using Google’s online installer it did not work. The file associations remained tied to Google Earth. So, we installed it using the offline installer found here. That did the trick, but apparently when you use the offline installer, the automatic updates are turned off. We then tried using the online installer for Google Earth Pro and it reset the associations back to Google Earth! Google must have got something wrong with the latest online installer.

If you are adventurous and wish to change the associations via the Windows Registry, find the following two keys:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\GoogleEarth.kmlfile\shell\open\command
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\GoogleEarth.kmzfile\shell\open\command

And change thier values to the following to associate files with Google Earth Pro
"C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Google Earth Pro\client\googleearth.exe" "%1"

Warning: Incorrectly modifying the Windows registry can have disastrous consequences. Please only try it if you are comfortable with making registry changes.

For the majority of people, however, once you have Google Earth Pro, you no-longer need Google Earth so you can simply uninstall it.

The post File associations and a Google Earth / Google Earth Pro dual installation appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth Enterprise to be open sourced!

mer 01-02-2017

Google has just announced that it is open sourcing Google Earth Enterprise. Google Earth Enterprise is software that can be used to host the equivalent of the Google Earth or the Google Maps databases. This is useful for organisations that have their own datasets that they would like to share internally or with customers.

The announcement post shows this image:

Presumably it can potentially also be used to share datasets with the public, not just private access as described.

We actually don’t know much more about Google Earth Enterprise as it has, until now, been restricted to use by governments and enterprises with big budgets.

In early 2015, Google made the decision to discontinue its Google Earth Enterprise business and stopped charging current customers for it. At the same time made Google Earth Pro free. The intention at the time was to move customers to alternative products from companies such as Esri. Esri even went as far as to create a Google Earth look-alike as part of that transition. However, it would seem that many customers got used to free and are happy with the Google Earth Enterprise product. And so, they did not move, hence Google’s decision to open source the platform. We applaud Google’s decision on this as it shows they do care about their customers even two years after depreciating the product. Admittedly, Google is hoping that Google Earth Enterprise users will make use of Google’s cloud platform, but that is not a requirement to use the product.

The post Google Earth Enterprise to be open sourced! appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

The best of Google Earth for January 2017

mar 31-01-2017

The big Google Earth news this month was a relatively minor update to the client. But its release does indicate continued interest by Google in the Google Earth product. After several years of very minor bug fixes, this update actually had a minor new feature as well as updating the interface components.

On a less positive note, the radar layer stopped working and Google decided to remove it, leaving the cloud layer as the only remaining ‘weather’ layer.

We had a look at a Chinese nuclear submarine in the Karachi port in Pakistan and a nearby scrapped oil tanker that exploded in an unrelated incident.

We had a look at “The Floating Piers” on Lake Iseo, Italy and “The Gates” in Central Park, New York by artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude.

We created a JavaScript tool for easily splitting Polygons or Paths. If you would like to see other similar utilities for manipulating KML, do let us know in the comments.

We talked about a setting in Google Earth that causes it to notify you when it encounters errors in KML. This is useful if you are a developer that produces KML.

We had a look at a nice Easter Egg in the latest version of Google Earth. We incorrectly stated that it was the first such Easter Egg in Google Earth. Apparently the Google Earth Flight Simulator was first introduced as an Easter Egg.

We created a JavaScript tool that takes a KML file and exports all its placemarks to .csv format which can then be imported into Excel or other products.

Google open-sourced a new compression library for 3D graphics and we speculated about whether or not it will be used in Google Earth and Google Maps to improve performance.

We had a look at what DigitalGlobe is doing with artificial intelligence to analyse satellite imagery.

We made our 2017 wish list for Google Earth and received a lot of extra wishes from GEB readers in the comments.

We released maps of the imagery updates of 2016 showing approximate locations of all imagery found in the ‘historical imagery layers’ for each month of 2016.

We made a number of observations about the 2016 imagery update maps.

We discussed the possible sale of Terra Bella, formerly Skybox Imaging, to Planet. More recent sources suggest the sale is in its advanced stages.

On January 14th, SpaceX had its first launch since the launchpad explosion one of its rockets suffered last September. In anticipation of this, we had a look at a number of SpaceX related sights in Google Earth. The launch was successful, as was the return of the first stage of the rocket, which landed on SpaceX drone ship ‘Just Read the Instructions’. See the full launch here. Fast-forward to the 27 minute mark to see the spectacular landing.

We had a look at a 3D building that appears to have been captured at multiple times and the imagery combined, so we can see it in different stages of construction.

We had a look at a river in Russia that turned a striking red colour due to pollution.

We had a look at a problem with the recently added global mosaics of Landsat and Sentinel-2 imagery that were added to historical imagery. The worst aspect of the problem – the mosaics not fading out when you zoom in – appears to have since been fixed.

Google updated the historical imagery layer in late December and we did a number of posts looking at various sights in the imagery.
We had a look at:

The post The best of Google Earth for January 2017 appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Chinese nuclear submarine in Karachi, Pakistan port

lun 30-01-2017

A recent story in the news was about a Chinese nuclear submarine being spotted in Google Earth imagery showing it docked in port at Karachi, Pakistan. The image in question was from May, 2016:


Submarine in Karachi, May 2016.

Since then, a new image from October 2016 has been added to Google Earth:

Another submarine in Karachi, October 2016.

But the submarine in the October image appears smaller, so is probably a Pakistan owned submarine. We can see two Pakistani submarines in a later October image in a different part of the port:


Pakistani submarines in Karachi, October 2016.

This makes us wonder whether or not it would be worthwhile for countries around the world to build roofs over their military ports to hide the movements of their submarines given the current easy access to satellite imagery.

We also wonder to what extent militaries around the world use Google Earth imagery to monitor other nations, or do they rely on their own sources. Our guess is that in this case, Indian intelligence services were well aware of the submarines visit long before it appeared in a Google Earth image.

Tanker Explosion
In November 2016, not far from the Karachi port, also in Pakistan, at the Gadani shipbreaking yard, an oil tanker that was being dismantled there exploded, killing at least six people and injuring over two hundred. Digital Globe captured an image of the location soon after as part of their FirstLook program


The oil tanker that exploded.

To find the above locations in Google Earth download this KML file.

The post Chinese nuclear submarine in Karachi, Pakistan port appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

“The Floating Piers” in Google Earth

ven 27-01-2017

“The Floating Piers” was an artwork by artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude on Lake Iseo, Italy, from June 18 to July 3, 2016. It is now visible in Google Earth.


The imagery on the left is older and shows the project still under construction.


We can see people crossing the walkway and others queuing.

See the official artists website here. One of the artists Jeanne-Claude, died, aged 74, on November 18, 2009. According to Wikipedia the artists began conceptualising the project in 1970. According to the web site the floating piers consist of:

From June 18 to July 3, 2016, Italy’s Lake Iseo was reimagined. The Floating Piers consisted of 100,000 square meters of shimmering yellow fabric, carried by a modular dock system of 220,000 high-density polyethylene cubes floating on the surface of the water.”

Although the artists have created a number of large scale art works since the 1960’s, the majority of them do not appear in Google Earth as there is not much imagery from that time period. However, we did find one other artwork, “The Gates” in Central Park, New York in 2005:

To find the above locations in Google Earth, download this KML file.

The post “The Floating Piers” in Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Splitting Google Earth Polygons and Paths

jeu 26-01-2017

We maintain a map of the 3D areas in Google Earth. This is achieved with the help of GEB readers who send in KML outlines of new areas. However, we often receive outlines that are not ideal and need some manipulation before inserting into our KML file. We have created a number of scripts that help us combine various combinations of Polygons and Paths to deal with most situations. But, there are still some cases where manual intervention is required. Possibly the most tedious task is when a Polygon or Path needs to be split into two. In Google Earth, this requires duplicating the feature with copy/paste, and then deleting half the points in each copy. For features with a large number or points this can take a while.

So, we decided to make a simple tool that splits Polygons or Paths.

For best results, just save from Google Earth a single Polygon or Path that you wish to split as a KML file then upload it below. It should show the feature on the map. If there is more than one feature in the KML then click on its name in the left hand column. It should then highlight the vertices. If it is a Polygon, click on a vertex to split it at that point and convert it into a path. Click any point on a Path to split it into two Paths. Click ‘Save’ to download the result as a KML file.

input[type="file"]{padding:4px;color:black}

Load

Save

 

 
If you submit KMLs of new 3D areas, please follow the guidelines found here. Essentially, the ideal format is a single Polygon for independent new areas, Paths for extensions, only covering the new areas and only on the outer edge.

[ Update: 2017-02-04 Updated the code to also handle MultiGeometries. ]

The post Splitting Google Earth Polygons and Paths appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Radar layer dropped from Google Earth

mer 25-01-2017

Thank you to GEB reader Jonah for letting us know that Google appears to have quietly dropped the ‘radar’ layer from the weather layers. This is in addition to the “Conditions and Forecast” and “Ocean Observations” layers which were dropped last October, having been broken for quite some time.

Google has added a short comment to the announcement page for the previous layers on the Google Maps help forum:

Update (2017-01-18): We’ve also removed the “Radar” layer as our third-party data feed has broken as well.”

So all that is left in the weather layers now is the ‘Clouds’ layer.


We noticed this interesting triangle-shaped storm in the South Atlantic

The post Radar layer dropped from Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Let Google Earth notify you of KML errors

mar 24-01-2017

This post is a tip for people who work with KML a lot and generate KML from sources other than Google Earth. This could be programmers generating KML through code, people manually creating KML files by hand (a tedious job, but doable), or people getting KML from third party applications.

Google Earth has a setting called ‘KML Error Handling’ which decides what to do when opening a KML file with errors or features that Google Earth does not recognise. It is well worth keeping this set to ‘show prompts for all errors’ to double-check that you are producing good KML. It won’t catch all problems, but it can catch issues that you might otherwise overlook.

If you don’t care about KML errors then it is best to keep the setting on ‘Silently accept all unrecognised data’ as having Google Earth notify you of every error can be annoying, especially if you have an error in something in your ‘Places’, as Google Earth will warn you every time you open Google Earth. In addition, one of the built-in layers in Google Mars contains some KML errors and will pop up a message every time you switch to Google Mars.

The post Let Google Earth notify you of KML errors appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth Easter Egg

lun 23-01-2017

The latest version of Google Earth that was released last week contains a nice Easter Egg hidden in the ‘about’ window.

To see this easter egg, open the ‘about’ window and right click the Google Earth logo rapidly about five times.

Maybe Google can consider making it context sensitive so you see a different one depending on what part of the earth you are viewing?

The post Google Earth Easter Egg appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

New Google Earth Version 7.1.8.3036

ven 20-01-2017

Thank you to GEB reader André for letting us know that Google has just updated Google Earth to version 7.1.8.3036. It is a minor bugfix update but does indicate Google’s continued dedication to Google Earth.

The main thing you will notice is a slightly more modern look to the menus and other interface features. The placemark list, for example now has ‘twisties’ instead of plus/minus symbols.

One of the notable bug fixes is the Feedback option in Windows (found under Help->Send Feedback). Hopefully this means they are going to be more active in listening to suggestions and bug reports.

An interesting addition is a couple of buttons to make it easier to add images to placemarks:

Official release notes

What’s New In Google Earth 7.1.8.3036 (from the release announcement).

Bugs Fixed

  • Various security issues
  • Some files missing from saved KMZs
  • Crash in View in Maps if user logged in
  • License-related problems with Earth Pro
  • Incorrectly-localized user interface elements
  • Settings/Preferences dialog unexpected behavior
  • Windows: View in Maps frozen
  • Windows: Feedback tool broken
  • Windows: program hangs when saving search results
  • Windows: installer doesn’t clean up files
  • Mac: crash running on OS X 10.6
  • Mac: installer conflicts between different Earth variants
  • Linux (Debian): search crash
  • Linux: installer not installing needed libraries
  • Linux: spurious network warning messages
  • Linux: crash viewing Moon landmarks

Changes

  • Image picker for placemark editing
  • Remove Earth Pro “upsell” links
  • Browser Plugin (bundled and standalone) discontinued
  • High-detail terrain enabled by default
  • Windows: Qt application library upgraded
  • Linux: Earth Pro now available
  • Linux: installers now signed

Known Issues

  • Tour guide, overlays sometimes overlap Startup Tips, About dialogs
  • Windows (7): Installer drawing issues
  • Linux: Earth Pro: Movie Maker, some GPS features not available
  • Linux: Earth Pro: Import dialogs sometimes slow/laggy

The post New Google Earth Version 7.1.8.3036 appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Google Earth placemarks to Excel

jeu 19-01-2017

It is often useful to be able to get Google Earth placemarks into Excel (or other spreadsheet application or even a database). One way to do this is to save your placemarks as a .KML file (do not use .KMZ) then rename the file to .XML. Then it will open in Excel. However, it will typically need quite a lot of cleaning up after that. So, we thought it might be useful to have a simple converter that takes a .KML or .KMZ and extracts all the placemarks (points only, ignoring polygons, paths and other features) and converts it to csv for easy import into Excel or other application. So, here it is:

input[type="file"]{padding:4px;color:black}

Convert

 

It only extracts the placemark name, description, latitude and longitude.

If you need other fields, or features, or encounter any bugs, please let us know in the comments.

To convert the other way (Excel to Google Earth), the easiest method is to use Google Earth Pro’s import feature described here. Another more complicated technique can be found here.

The post Google Earth placemarks to Excel appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Draco 3D compression library

mer 18-01-2017

Google recently open sourced a new 3D compression library called Draco. The new library promises high compression rates for 3D graphics and promises much faster page loads for web pages with 3D graphics.

It was apparently the Chrome Media team that developed the library, but we are wondering whether or not the Google Maps and Google Earth teams have taken note. Both Google Earth and Google Maps in ‘Earth’ mode would benefit significantly from better compression. We do not know what compression methodologies they currently use, or how they compare to this new library.

Google Earth benefits from having a cache, but as we found out when investigating how much data 3D imagery requires, the cache is actually quite small relative to the amount of 3D data available and unless your internet connection is blazingly fast, you will spend most of your time in Google Earth waiting for imagery to download and this is especially true for areas with 3D imagery. Better compression would not just speed up downloads, but also effectively boost the size of the cache – assuming the imagery is stored in the cache in compressed format.

Do any of our readers know what compression Google Earth and Google Maps currently use for 3D imagery?

The compression format for KML files is the standard ZIP format (when saved as KMZ).

2D imagery
Google Earth image overlays support .jpg and .png. When it comes to standard 2D satellite and aerial imagery, we do not know what it uses internally or what format is used to transfer imagery from the servers, but given that the Google Earth client has not seen any major version updates for years, our guess is that it is using rather out-dated compression. Google has put a lot of effort into 2D image compression formats, such as WebP, and Google Earth would probably benefit from those too.

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