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The Forts of Liege in World War I

lun 11-08-2014

With the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I occurring a few weeks ago, I expect we’ll see various recreations of events from the war in Google Earth as those individual 100 year anniversaries approach.

The first example of this I’ve seen comes from Bart Busschots. A few days ago marked the 100th anniversary of the German invasion of his native Belgium, and he’s created a map to show a bit about what happened.

From Bart’s site:

The first major battle of the campaign was centred on the ancient town and prince-bishopric of Liège in the north-east of the country. The Battle of Liège lasted from the 5th to the 16th of August 1914, and centred on the ring of 12 fortifications surrounding the town. Remains of all of these fortifications remain in the landscape, and can be clearly seen on satellite images. When reading about the battle I found myself wanting to better understand the geography of the region, and where the forts fit into the landscape, so I mapped their locations on Google Earth and saved them out as a KML file.

You can download that KML file here, or head out to Bart’s site to read the full article.

The post The Forts of Liege in World War I appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Using Google Earth to track environmental impact

ven 08-08-2014

We have discussed the amazing work that Google Earth Outreach does quite a few times on here, and they continue to assist with amazing projects around the world.

They recently released a video that showcases some of the work that they’ve done with nonprofit organizations in Canada. Check it out:

The organizations involved in this include:

  • “Caribou Migration,” by Golder Associates Ltd & Hugh Stimson
  • “I Am Fish,” by the David Suzuki Foundation
  • “Canada’s Boreal, the World’s Largest Intact Forest,” by Pew Environment Group
  • “Voices on the Land,” by Okanagan Nation Alliance, Gregory Kehm Associates & Ecotrust Canada
  • “Oil & Water Map,” by the Living Oceans Society
  • “Natural Capital,” by the David Suzuki Foundation

For more, check out the official Google Earth Outreach website.

(via +Google for Nonprofits)

The post Using Google Earth to track environmental impact appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones