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James Fee GIS Blog

Syndiquer le contenu James Fee
CTO @Cityzenith5D. BIM + GIS, 3D Smart City technology.
Mis à jour : il y a 13 min 52 sec

The End of GIS

mar 17-07-2018

So yea, link bait title, sue me.  But I felt like it needed to be there.  But before I go into what that all means, I’m going to continue blogging over on Medium but with a new focus. The RSS feed, email blasts, and Twitter account will cease to produce original content.

So why is there an end to anything?  I’ve been working toward this end for some time, the focus has been to move away from proprietary stacks and toward open source.  But there is a more significant theme to this.  Pivoting away from specialized software that is good at one thing, towards libraries to get things done.  Regardless I’m now working at a company that specializes in aggregating, analyzing and visualizing 3D data.  GIS has been useful at many things, but 3D was never one of it.

The start of Spatially Adjusted happened over the course of a family vacation to my wife at the time’s in-laws in rural Texas.  I can’t recall exactly what made me start, but it was the intersection of Esri and Open Source.  This was pre-OSGeo, things in my life were still ArcGIS and mostly ArcIMS.  There was a ton about me being excited about EDN when that first arrived and unboxing ArcGIS 9.1.  But I was getting into open source.  In fact, the first time I blogged about PostGIS, Sean Gillies was quick to put me in my place.  Because of course I was a big Esri supporter, and all he saw was someone complaining about the quality of the software.

My blog has a big story arc in it.  I go from “Esri blogger” to “Esri hater.”  Early on I used to get Esri passing me info to get the word out.  The reality of this was there was no Twitter or Facebook yet, so the only place people could be open was my comments on my blog posts.  But over the years I grew bitter about the software.  I grew tired of competing against Esri on contracts.  I became angry at software being half-baked and having to rewrite things every few years.  Look, there was a ton to like about the Esri Web ADF…  No wait, there wasn’t.  I’m sure people worked very hard on it, and they probably take it personally when I call it a POS but it was.  Engineers aren’t at fault for creating the Web ADF, Esri marketing is at fault for choosing to push it.

I honestly could write pages on why I dislike things about Esri but I won’t.  I’m honestly over it.  I look back at ArcObjects, MapObjects, Web ADF and the rest and I feel like it was a different person.  I cannot picture myself doing that work anymore, and that’s OK, we all grow up and grow into what we enjoy.  That’s the big picture through this journey, being open to change.  The “threat” of Google Earth, the “threat” of open source, the “threat” of the ELA.  All irrelevant in the end.  The most prominent part of our professional lives is our ability to handle change.  Don’t assume anything, just look for ways to improve your workflows, provide better service toward others and be proud of your career.

Throughout this journey, there have been a couple people who have affected great change in me.  Early on I can only think of two people; Howard Butler and Sean Gillies.  Both forced me to look at how I perceived open tools such as GDAL, UMN MapServer, and PostGIS.  Sean more than anyone called out my proprietary bullshit and while I didn’t agree with everything he said, it did open my eyes.  Later on, blogging brought me into contact with more developers.  People such as Bill Dollins, Dave Bouwman, and Brian Flood.  The work they were doing, even in the Esri ecosystem really helped me grow.  Even inside Esri, the creation of EDN and the DevSummit introduced me to Brian Goldin, Steve Pousty and Rob Elkins who basically made the first DevSummit my Woodstock.

I also can’t stress enough how many people I’ve met over the years because of this blog.  Not a conference goes by where someone introduces themselves to me and tells me they follow me.  That means a ton as personal networks is what drives us all.  It has been those who introduce me to the fantastic stuff they are working on that inspires my passion.  But that is why I think my story arc went from “Esri blogger” to the intersection of 3D BIM and GIS.

I really can’t think of anyone I’ve met over these years I don’t have a ton of respect for.  From Art Haddad pushing ArcGIS Server to be something more than a hacked together project to Jim Barry always making sure I could find the right documentation or developer help, I’ve always been lucky enough to find the right person to help out.  I really could go, but everyone should know what a great asset you are and still will be.

So what now for me?  At Cityzenith I’m focused on building the platform that the real estate and AEC industries can use to make a better world.  This blog has been on so many different platforms over the years.  Best I can recall the progress went; Blogger -> MovableType -> WordPress -> Octopress -> WordPress -> Github Pages -> WordPress and rather than port it over to yet another platform I think it has earned the right to relax.  Just like PlanetGS.com got to retire in dignity, so will Spatially Adjusted.

So follow me over at Medium where I’ll be talking about Elastic, Unity, Mapbox, Turf.js, Tippecanoe, Safe FME, 3D formats, AWS (including Lex, Lambda and Comprehend) and using Unity inside web browsers and mobile devices.  Should be a blast!

So I think I’ll just leave this here because it is how I feel.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Shadow Analysis Using Mapbox, Unity and OpenStreetMap

lun 14-05-2018

We’ve been pushing along with our latest release of Smart World Professional, and we’ve got some elegant tools coming online that will showcase why we went the route we did.  One of the biggest requests from the AEC industry is Shadow/Solar analysis.  There are tons of tools that do this, but they can be expensive, hard to use and even hard to get data for.  That’s why I really like the Mapbox Unity SDK and its 3D buildings.

You can, of course, load your own buildings into Smart World Professional but this is a great way to see how your projects will impact the surrounding city out of the box with our tools.  The Unity SDK really shines with this kind of work.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

25 years of Geospatial

jeu 19-04-2018

I was just thinking about this on my plane flight back from Cityzenith HQ. Spring of 1993 I was first exposed to what I later learned was called GIS because some guy in Canada had the smarts to label what we were all learning to do. My exposure in college was mostly because pen and paper cartography I was learning didn’t work out for me, a computer geek since my Dad brought home a TI-99/4a and I discovered you could write applications.

Of course, I bought my stupid pen set for some considerable amount of money (at least to a college student back then) and tried to draw the Puget Sound with any degree of accuracy. Seriously though, if you’ve ever seen me draw even a circle or a square you can pretty much guess how this “puget sound” looked like (I recall it looked like an eggplant crossed with a maple leaf). I recall sitting in the computer lab for the statistics class and seeing that on the Macintosh computer a copy of Aldus Freehand was there. I fired that up, drew a damn good looking Puget Sound and submitted it to the teacher. So I didn’t even get an F, he gave me an incomplete which was to be expected back then. Computers were for spreadsheets and reports, not cartography.

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But while this was going on, I had zero idea that this problem had already been solved by many people, including those Canadians I mentioned earlier. But it took two more years for me to be connected to the mid-decade US census and my internship at the City of Mesa, AZ planning department until I was exposed to Arc/INFO 5 and ArcView 2 on Unix to see how the world of points, polylines and polygons existed. But there I was creating maps in Freehand and throwing SPSS tables on top of them. GIS as we know it today, but I had zero idea what the heck I was doing. Originally being an Economics major I had the concept of table + pie chart/line graph down pat. I just replaced the chart with a hand-drawn map.

This week has been about sun angles, shadow analysis and time sliders in Unity, but it’s hard not to think back to a time where my struggle against drawing a map by hand introduced me to computer maps and eventually a career for basically 25 years. I can see an alternate universe where 1993 James sucked it up, worked hard to draw the water body by hand and became a city planner in some small midwestern city. Thank god that didn’t happen, and I was able to grow from Arc/INFO -> ArcView -> PC ArcInfo -> ArcInfo Workstation -> ArcGIS Desktop -> FME Desktop -> uDIG -> QGIS and then on to the multitude of open source libraries I use in my day to day workflows.

While that is a fun path to think of, I get excited to my next 25 years in spatial. Working with Unity, OSM, Elastic and AWS Lambda I can see how what we do has such a great exciting future ahead of us. The world loves what we do, and we’re lucky enough to be able to do it every day. Don’t let anyone make you feel bad for using software or products because it’s not “hipster” or “open.” If you’re pushing the bar forward, that’s good enough.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

The Matrix of Spatial Data

lun 16-04-2018

I was thinking this morning about how much of my professional life has been about vector data. From the moment I started using Macromedia Freehand in college in the early 90s (before I had heard about GIS) to make maps to the 3D work, I’m doing with Unity and Cityzenith I’ve used vector data. I wasn’t genuinely introduced to raster data until I started using ArcInfo 5 at my first internship and working with grids and even then it was still about coverages and typing “build” or “clean” again and again. We did a bunch of raster analysis with Arc, but mostly it was done in Fortran by others (I never was able to pick up Fortran for some reason, probably best in the long run).

It’s easy to see and use vectors in professional spatial work for sure. I always feel like Neo from the Matrix, I look at features in the world and mentally classify them as vectors:

  • Bird -> point
  • Electrical transmission line -> line
  • House -> polygon

Heck or how you might think of a bird as a point (sighting), line (migratory pattern) or polygon (range). So damn nerdy and my wife fails to see the fun in any of this. Again, like Neo when he finally sees the world like the Matrix truly is we see things as the basic building blocks of vector data.

As I’m flying to Chicago this morning and I stare out the window of the airplane, I can’t help but think of rasters though. Sort of like that hybrid background we throw on maps, the world beneath me is full of opportunities to create vectors. Plus I bet we could run some robust agriculture analysis (assuming I even knew what that was) to boot. The world is not full of 1s and 0s but full of rasters and vectors.

As I’m a point, traveling a line on my way to a polygon, I can’t help but appreciate the spatial world that has been part of my life for over 20 years. I can’t help but think the next 20 is going to be amazing.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones