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The Map Room ended in June 2011. These are blog posts about maps made since then.
Mis à jour : il y a 23 min 4 sec

Google Maps Edits Cause Embarrassment

dim 26-04-2015

Some embarrassment for Google Maps last week, as they were forced to apologize for an image of the Android mascot peeing on an Apple logo that turned up on the map near Rawalpindi in Pakistan. To say nothing of the phrase "Google review policy is crap" etched into nearby Takht Pari Forest. Both have since been removed. Boing Boing, the Guardian, The Verge.

To be fair to Google, crowdsourcing map data does have its pitfalls: OpenStreetMap has to deal with this sort of thing all the time. You have to have something in place to deal with bad-faith edits. None of the edits I've made to Google Maps went through without someone reviewing them, so I'm surprised that this could happen. That said, when you need your map updated fast (such as during natural disasters like yesterday's earthquake in Nepal), it's hard to beat crowdsourcing.

As always, it's important to keep in mind that all online maps have their shortcomings.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Map of Canada Changes Depiction of Arctic Sea Ice

ven 17-04-2015

The federal government's new map of Canada, part of the Atlas of Canada reference series, came out this week. Among the changes between it and its predecessor (which came out in 2006), one in particular is drawing attention. Ivan Semeniuk in the Globe and Mail:

Whereas the older version of the map showed only that part of the sea ice that permanently covered Arctic waters year round at that time, the new edition uses a 30-year median of September sea-ice extent from 1981 through 2010. September sea ice hit a record low in 2012 and is projected to decline further. The change means there is far more ice shown on the 2015 version of the map than on its predecessor.

The changes can be seen below: the 2006 map is on the left, the 2015 map on the right.

Now as Semeniuk's piece points out, neither way is wrong. But all maps have a point of view, and it's naive to think that this change was made in a value-neutral environment: this was the result of a conscious decision. The reason for that decision -- that's what's interesting.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

New Moon Maps

ven 17-04-2015

Two stunning maps of the Moon have been released by the USGS, both based on data collected by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: one an image mosaic assembled from visual imagery, the other (above) a colour-coded topographical map derived from laser altimeter data. Via io9.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Space Maps: Ceres, Mars, Exoplanets

mer 15-04-2015

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Unruly Places (Off the Map)

mar 17-02-2015

Alastair Bonnett's Unruly Places (first published in the U.K. as Off the Map) is a light, entertaining exploration of some of the world's more unusual places. Bonnett, a social geography professor at Newcastle University, has written 47 short essays about locations that, in the grand scheme of things, don't make any sense: the exceptions, the asterisks, the ink blots (in at least one case literally) on the map.

These range from the deeply frivolous to the profoundly injust: from bits and pieces of New York City transformed into environmental time capsules and art projects to places meaningful to the author; from rendition sites and pirate bases to Bedouin settlements in the Israeli Negev desert; from destroyed landscapes to Potemkin cities. The places often feel almost science-fictional; and in fact several of them evoked settings in existing science fiction works, like Christopher Priest's Dream Archipelago and Maureen McHugh's Nekropolis.

All in all, a pleasant diversion for the geographically minded, though I did have one quibble: the book calling latitude and longitude "Google Earth coordinates," as though degrees are as proprietary as limited to the KML format.

Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies
by Alastair Bonnett
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Viking Canada, July 2014
Buy at Amazon: Canada, U.S. | Kindle: Canada, U.S.

Off the Map: Lost Spaces, Invisible Cities, Forgotten Islands, Feral Places and What They Tell Us About the World
Aurum Press, April 2014
Buy at Amazon UK | Kindle

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Emily Garfield's Map Art

lun 16-02-2015

Emily Garfield's art is a pen-and-watercolour exercise in the cartography of imaginary places. Her drawings "are inspired by the visual language of maps, as well as the fractal similarity that cities share with biological processes such as the patterns of cells and neurons." Above: "Branching Networks (Cityspace #178)."

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Map Anniversaries

mar 10-02-2015

Google Maps turned 10 years old on Sunday -- a milestone observed by Samuel Gibbs in the Guardian. See also Liz Gannes's retrospective at Re/Code. My reaction on launch day was pretty effusive -- I was blown away mainly by the user interface. But it wasn't immediately dominant: it took roughly four years for Google to surpass MapQuest in traffic.

Meanwhile, the Pro version of Google Earth, which used to cost $400/year, is now free. Google Earth itself launched in June 2005, so is approaching its own 10-year anniversary, but it began its existence a few years earlier as Keyhole EarthViewer 3D.

Speaking of map anniversaries, National Geographic Maps is marking its centennial.

The photo above marks another anniversary: It shows Apollo 14 astronaut Ed Mitchell consulting a map during his second lunar EVA on February 6, 1971. Apollo 14 returned to Earth 44 years ago yesterday.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Daniel Reeve, Film Cartographer

sam 07-02-2015

Someone was responsible for the maps developed for the film adaptations of The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit and other movies (on-screen and in promotional materials), and that someone is Daniel Reeve, a freelance artist who also did a lot of the letterwork and calligraphy. Via Boing Boing.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones