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The Map Room - A Weblog about Maps

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The Map Room ended in June 2011. These are blog posts about maps made since then.
Mis à jour : il y a 1 heure 43 min

Unruly Places (Off the Map)

mar 17-02-2015

Alastair Bonnett's Unruly Places (first published in the U.K. as Off the Map) is a light, entertaining exploration of some of the world's more unusual places. Bonnett, a social geography professor at Newcastle University, has written 47 short essays about locations that, in the grand scheme of things, don't make any sense: the exceptions, the asterisks, the ink blots (in at least one case literally) on the map.

These range from the deeply frivolous to the profoundly injust: from bits and pieces of New York City transformed into environmental time capsules and art projects to places meaningful to the author; from rendition sites and pirate bases to Bedouin settlements in the Israeli Negev desert; from destroyed landscapes to Potemkin cities. The places often feel almost science-fictional; and in fact several of them evoked settings in existing science fiction works, like Christopher Priest's Dream Archipelago and Maureen McHugh's Nekropolis.

All in all, a pleasant diversion for the geographically minded, though I did have one quibble: the book calling latitude and longitude "Google Earth coordinates," as though degrees are as proprietary as limited to the KML format.

Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies
by Alastair Bonnett
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Viking Canada, July 2014
Buy at Amazon: Canada, U.S. | Kindle: Canada, U.S.

Off the Map: Lost Spaces, Invisible Cities, Forgotten Islands, Feral Places and What They Tell Us About the World
Aurum Press, April 2014
Buy at Amazon UK | Kindle

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Emily Garfield's Map Art

lun 16-02-2015

Emily Garfield's art is a pen-and-watercolour exercise in the cartography of imaginary places. Her drawings "are inspired by the visual language of maps, as well as the fractal similarity that cities share with biological processes such as the patterns of cells and neurons." Above: "Branching Networks (Cityspace #178)."

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Map Anniversaries

mar 10-02-2015

Google Maps turned 10 years old on Sunday -- a milestone observed by Samuel Gibbs in the Guardian. See also Liz Gannes's retrospective at Re/Code. My reaction on launch day was pretty effusive -- I was blown away mainly by the user interface. But it wasn't immediately dominant: it took roughly four years for Google to surpass MapQuest in traffic.

Meanwhile, the Pro version of Google Earth, which used to cost $400/year, is now free. Google Earth itself launched in June 2005, so is approaching its own 10-year anniversary, but it began its existence a few years earlier as Keyhole EarthViewer 3D.

Speaking of map anniversaries, National Geographic Maps is marking its centennial.

The photo above marks another anniversary: It shows Apollo 14 astronaut Ed Mitchell consulting a map during his second lunar EVA on February 6, 1971. Apollo 14 returned to Earth 44 years ago yesterday.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Daniel Reeve, Film Cartographer

sam 07-02-2015

Someone was responsible for the maps developed for the film adaptations of The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit and other movies (on-screen and in promotional materials), and that someone is Daniel Reeve, a freelance artist who also did a lot of the letterwork and calligraphy. Via Boing Boing.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Atlas of Canada

mar 23-12-2014

I only just now found out about the new edition of Canadian Geographic's Atlas of Canada -- via an item broadcast on CTV yesterday -- or I would have included it in this year's gift guide. It's apparently the first new edition in a decade. (Incidentally this should not be confused with the Canadian government's online Atlas of Canada, an entirely distinct beast.)

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

The Patterson Projection

mer 03-12-2014

Map projections are inherently interesting, and also a great way to start a fight among a group of cartographers: just ask them their favourite and step back. Everyone has their preferred projection, me included, that fits their own needs and aesthetic. Cartographer Tom Patterson, whose work I've featured previously on The Map Room, has added another projection to the mix, the eponymous Patterson Projection, a cylindrical projection which "falls between the popular Miller 1, which excessively exaggerates the size of polar areas, and the Plate Carrée, which compressess the north-south dimension of mid latitudes." It looks like a compromise projection in cylindrical form. A full article on the design and development of the projection is forthcoming at the link.

Previously: Shaded Relief World Map and Flex Projector; New, Free Physical Map of the United States; Shaded Relief.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones

Geologic Maps of Vesta

mar 18-11-2014

Geologic maps of Vesta, the asteroid visited by the Dawn spacecraft between July 2011 and September 2012, have been produced for a special issue of the planetary science journal Icarus. Above, a global geologic map of Vesta, compiled from 15 individual quad maps and using a Mollweide projection (Vesta itself is decidedly non-spheroid, but still). Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU.

Previously: Atlas of Vesta.

Catégories: Sites Anglophones